Media Monday: Kristina Moy, Red Tricycle

Each Monday, we’re giving readers a chance to get to know the media a little better.

With a little flair.

Our goal is to give readers some insight into the work and work style of area journalists, and get to know a little bit about the person behind the byline. Start your week off with an online networking opportunity through our Media Monday blog post.

This Week: Kristina Moy, Red Tricycle Seattle Editor

Kristina MoyKristina has been working in broadcast media as a Public Relations and Media Relations Specialist since 1998. During that time, she developed and implemented highly successful PR and marketing campaigns for companies such as KIRO Television, The Washington Traffic Safety Commission, Feld Entertainment, and Feld Motor Sports. She also produced several large-scale television events and community fundraisers.

Kristina joined the Red Tricycle team in February of 2011 as a Calendar Editor and Writer. In 2012, she added Events Marketing Coordinator to her title and began representing Red Tricycle on TV and in the community. She was promoted to Seattle Editor in January 2013. Kristina holds a BA degree from the University of Washington in both Speech Communication and Anthropology, and has been nominated for two Northwest Regional EMMY Awards from the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences. Kristina is a Northwest native and mom of two, very active boys.

Q: What’s the best thing about being in the Seattle media scene?

A: Seattle has such a diverse population with an incredibly broad range of interests and goals. It’s a smart, medium-sized urban hub that is growing and evolving at a rapid rate. I’m very lucky to be able to cover its progress.

Q: How has social media changed what you do?

A: It’s changed the way I interact with readers because it’s on a more personal level. Whether its active and influential members of the community or my neighbors down the street, Seattle-area parents are using the Red Tricycle articles that we personally research and write as their go-to guide for family-friendly activities. That is very satisfying but it also creates a responsibility to our readers to continually improve and evolve.

Q: If you could have someone else’s job, what would it be?

A: Ever since I was a young girl, I wanted to have my own talk show.

Q: Press releases: Love them or hate them?

A: I get dozens of press releases every week and have a love-hate relationship with them. I love them if they’re embedded in an email, if they’re to the point, and if they include a link to additional information like hi-res images. I hate them when they’re sent as attachments, when they’re full of grammatical mistakes and when they’re non-newsworthy.

Q: What hidden talent or skill do you have that viewers/readers don’t know about you?

A: I love to run. I started running after the birth of my boys to relieve stress, and just to get a break from them! I enjoyed it so much that I started training for marathons and have completed two half marathons!

The PR Pro Takeaway: Kristina’s thoughts on press releases are a great reminder to evaluate the news value of your news and make sure they are going to the right contacts. Kristina’s versatility is a credit to Red Tricycle readers!

Check out Media Monday blogs from the PRGN!

Landis Communications

Media Monday: Emily Heffter, The Seattle Times

Each Monday, we’re giving readers a chance to get to know the media a little better.

With a little flair.

Our goal is to give readers some insight into the work and work style of area journalists, and get to know a little bit about the person behind the byline. Start your week off with an online networking opportunity through our Media Monday blog post.

This Week: Emily Heffter, The Seattle Times

ImageEmily Heffter is a local government reporter at The Seattle Times. Since joining the paper in 2002, she has bike-raced Mike McGinn down Dexter Avenue North (and won); covered a Seattle School Board meeting that went on so long that the lights turned off automatically; and dropped her cell phone in a toilet at a NASCAR race while reporting on a potential Snohomish County track.

Q: What’s the best thing about being in the Seattle media scene?

A: Seattle has a unique culture that goes deeper than coffee and fleece. It’s a smart, innovative place with a real civic conscience, and I’m privileged to help document its progress and foibles.

Q: How has social media changed what you do?

A: I’m more connected to my readers now. We have a more personal relationship. It also makes breaking news even more competitive, which I think is fun.

Q: If you could have someone else’s job, what would it be?

A: Writing novels at a coffee shop.

Q: Press releases: Love them or hate them?

A: Well, I need them too much to hate them, but I delete too many of them to love them.

Q: What hidden talent or skill do you have that viewers/readers don’t know about you?

A: Every year I make a point to get up on a slalom waterski, just to rebel against advancing middle age.

The PR Pro Takeaway: Great thoughts here on social media’s influence on the media. Breaking news is now more of a competition because it can be broken in so many different mediums. It’s a good reminder to be mindful of what you Tweet. Find Emily on Twitter (or on a waterski).

The Fearey Group: A Legacy Built on Integrity and Creativity

By, Aaron Blank

Pat Fearey and I hit it off right away. I wasn’t really looking for a new job, so I met her on a whim. That was almost eight years ago, and I was at Edelman at the time. The Fearey Group had sent out a blast email touting a job opening.

Meeting Pat for the first time was something of an occasion. Here was a person who had really made a name for herself in the local community. How many people can say they helped create Redmond or Snoqualmie Ridge? How cool is that? She also had a reputation for integrity, of always taking the high road. It was a belief that, over time, good things happen to people who commit to doing good things. It mirrored my own ethics perfectly.

The first thing you notice about Pat is that gentle Southern accent, so different from my own. I am a native New Yorker, a former radio news guy who came out to Seattle to experience the west coast and to be closer to my wife’s family. Pat is obviously not from around here, either. In clubby Seattle, where she was often the only woman in a roomful of men, she became a Seattle luminary. That’s no small feat.  She didn’t stay in business for more than 30 years by playing it safe. It was more than values. It was taking risks and putting a huge value on creativity.

“Fearless Thinking” is more than corporate motto for The Fearey Group. It’s really woven into our collective DNA. When I wanted to expand our video capabilities, Pat handed me the company credit card and told me to get whatever I needed. I built out our video suite, and we began projects that included video graphing brain surgeries and live streaming a sleep disorder treatment. Fearless Thinking led to the pioneering of Social Media Journalism – a graph term we eventually trademarked.

Pat appreciated and demonstrated Fearless Thinking in so many ways. Mike Flynn, former publisher of the Puget Sound Business Journal, recently told me that Pat brainstormed the original idea of a special section in their weekly newspaper. A client had a story to tell and no easy way to tell it. Pat got creative. That’s a huge part of her influence that continues in The Fearey Group today and into the future.

For Pat, progress meant buying an IBM Selectric. For me, it’s becoming one of the early pioneers of Google Glass. Technology can allow us to do amazing things, but only we’re not afraid to try it. Again, “Fearless Thinking.”

I feel truly honored to have worked for Pat these last few years. I feel even more humbled to take over the company that bears her name. We’ll continue to grow, evolve, and embrace opportunities, all the while celebrating our clients’ successes and sharing their challenges. We won’t be doing the same things the same ways in five years, let alone 30. But we’ll still rely on Pat for advice and inspiration, and we’ll still call ourselves The Fearey Group.  Because the name stands for integrity and creativity. As legacies go, that’s pretty cool.

Media Monday, Mai Hoang, Yakima Herald-Republic

Each Monday, we’re giving readers a chance to get to know the media a little better.

With a little flair.

Our goal is to give readers some insight into the work and work style of area journalists, and get to know a little bit about the person behind the byline. Start your week off with an online networking opportunity through our Media Monday blog post.

This Week: Mai Hoang, Yakima Herald-Republic

Mai HoangMai Hoang is a business reporter for the Yakima Herald-Republic in Yakima, Wash., covering a wide range of topics including economic development, real estate, aviation, retail and the wine industry. Her stories have been published in newspapers throughout the Pacific Northwest.

Mai loves reporting and loves to find new ways to share that information, be it by shooting video or writing code. Along with her reporting duties, Mai is also president of the Seattle chapter of the Asian American Journalists Association, which aims to increase the number of Asian American journalists in the journalism industry and to promote fair and accurate coverage of the Asian American and Pacific Islander community.

Mai is passionate about building up the next generation of journalists. For the last two years, she has served as coordinator of the Valley Workshop, a weekend-long workshop that provides high school students in the Yakima Valley a taste of what it takes to be a reporter, photographer and videographer.

When she’s not working, she enjoys spending time with her husband, Jerome Parmentier, running, cooking and watching Korean dramas.

Q: What’s your favorite story you’ve done in the last week?

A: I recently wrote a story about Diep Miller, a Yakima restaurant owner. In May, she purchased a restaurant that was to be run by her nephew, who recently arrived from Vietnam a few months ago and had agreed to take it over in two years.  But in July, the nephew and his family left suddenly. She was left with a five-year-lease and a bank loan to pay. The story talks about how she’s moving on from the heartbreak to make the restaurant work. I know it was difficult for Diep to share her story with me, but I’m glad she did – her story resonated with a lot of our readers.

Q: What skills do new journalists need?

A: Knowledge of journalism ethics, strong interviewing and good storytelling always need to be part of the equation. Learning how to shoot and edit video, using Twitter and other social media platforms and writing quick, but accurate updates to the web are just tools that help you do the three core skills above.

Q: If you weren’t working at your current job, what would you be doing?

A: Good question. I have been pursuing journalism since I was 16 (about 15 years), so I haven’t had a chance to think about other options. But while serving as treasurer for the Seattle Chapter of the Asian American Journalists Association, I realize I have a knack for bookkeeping, so perhaps accounting? (It’s not true that all journalists are bad at math).

Q: Finish this sentence: “A good PR person is …

A: ” …good at doing their homework, i.e. they do research on the publication and their coverage before pitching.

Q: What hidden talent or skill do you have that viewers/readers don’t know about you?

A: I make really good Bacon Chocolate Chip Cookies.

PR Pro Takeaway: What sets this journalist apart is her dedication to giving back to her craft and community. She’s taken upon her self to serve as a mentor to other Asian journalists. Also, Bacon Chocolate Chip Cookies …enough said! Connect with Mai on Twitter.

Last Night’s Really Big News

by Alex Fryer

Seattle voters made history last night, radically changing the political landscape in ways we can barely foretell. No, I’m not talking about the mayor’s race, which trended along an anticipated narrative. The big game-changer last night was Charter Amendment 19, which ends the current way of electing city council members at-large. Instead, it creates a City Council where seven members are elected by district, and two citywide.

In all the hue and cry of the mayor’s race, this radical departure from the status quo was largely overlooked. The Seattle Times reported that the pro-Charter Amendment 19 campaign was largely supported by a single benefactor, North Seattle business advocate, Faye Garneau, who contributed $232,447 of the campaign’s $262,860. The campaign against district elections raised just $5,400.

That kind of financial imbalance doesn’t usually make for good public policy. During the campaign, current city council members seemed reluctant to take on district elections. Maybe they’re good prognosticators: the measure appears to be winning 64-36 percent. That’s a landslide in anyone’s book.

What will be the results? You can expect a lot more people to file for City Council. After all, the cost of running a campaign in, say, Southeast Seattle or downtown and Magnolia is a lot cheaper than citywide. And you can expect that, once in office, these folks will keep an ear close to the ground. And that ground will only cover a handful of neighborhoods. And who cares what an adjacent district thinks of them? The only constituents who matter are the ones that vote.

Ideally, district representation will mean everyone will know who to call in City Hall when the potholes get too large, the graffiti too obnoxious, or the police too lackadaisical.  The complaint line will be open.

On the flip side, the Mayor’s Office will likely be empowered to play off council members against each other, and public policy will no doubt become a series of horse trades, some of it visible and obvious, some of it not.

Under district elections, we may know who to call to complain. But we may actually know less about what’s really going on.

Zero to Social in 90 Minutes …with Fearey’s Aaron Blank

AaronBlankHeadshot-63By Rosalind Brazel

Social Media is an essential tool to marketing your business, creating brand awareness and announcing company news to the public. But many organizations struggle to add this layer to the fold because there are no manuals, no set rules, very few guidelines to venture into social media.

Washington Federal, KIRO radio and MyNorthwest.com are hosting your next social media event in Seattle. On Monday, November 18th you will have an opportunity to jump-start your social media knowledge at the Zero to Social in 90 Minutes lunch and panel presentation. Top social media experts, including The Fearey Group’s president Aaron Blank (and soon-to-be CEO), will participate in a Q&A panel session to cover the basics and beyond on the topic of social media.

To tease you, Aaron provided a sample Q&A of what you may hear at the event:

1. How do you decide which social media applications are best for you/your company?

I try to play around with every possible social media platform. I find the top performing ones by looking at Apple’s application store. In the store, it lists the top performers. This tells me what the hottest apps are and which ones I should be playing around with almost on a daily basis.

2. What is the biggest misconception about social media?

That it is new. It is not new. I’ve been using it since the dial-up Internet days of the 80’s. It was slower, but it was still social. I spent time in chat rooms on America OnLine. Then in the late 90’s, I spent time on Instant Messenger… and so on. The tools are changing but social media has been around for quite some time!

3. What is the future of social media?

The expansion of mobile is influencing the future of social media. In other parts of the world, commercial billboards communicate with you as you walk past them (via your mobile device). That, too, will be here shortly.

4. Which social media application do you use the most and why?

I have too many. Facebook. Twitter. Instagram. Vimeo. YouTube. Foursquare (I have a love/hate relationship with it). Yelp. Waazi. LinkedIn. Pinterest. Lively. Uber. Evernote. Flipboard. Why do I use so many? Our world revolves around it.

5. You were an early adopter on Twitter, what was that like?

I received a 5-year anniversary reminder from Twitter this year. I’ve been using it since 2009. As a result, I’ve developed five years’ worth of online relationships that have now become offline relationships. Twitter back then was the same, just not as easy to use. If people find themselves not on it yet, they can still jump aboard. It is never too late. It is worth the time!

6. Some people say social media hinders the ability to engage in traditional verbal/written communication. Your response?

Communicating in 140 characters or less is a challenge. Doing it well helps your overall communication skills.

Aaron’s fellow panelists include Shauna Causey, Decide.com, and Evonne Benedict, KING 5’s social media manager.

The event is brought to you by Washington Federal and MyNorthwest.com and is hosted by Linda Thomas, from KIRO radio’s morning news program. To register for the event, go here.

For more info, click this audio link:

Media Monday: David Nelson, Kitsap Sun

Each Monday, we’re giving readers a chance to get to know the media a little better.

With a little flair.

Our goal is to give readers some insight into the work and work style of area journalists, and get to know a little bit about the person behind the byline. Start your week off with an online networking opportunity through our Media Monday blog post.

This Week: David Nelson, Kitsap Sun

 ImageDavid Nelson has been the editor of the Kitsap Sun and Kitsapsun.com for five years, and previously worked at community newspapers in Logan, Utah and Boston. He’s a Pacific Northwest native with an English degree from Chicago’s North Park University and a master’s in journalism from Boston University.

Q: What’s your favorite story you’ve done in the last week?

A: I didn’t write it, but our newsroom reported that a suspect was caught trying to rob a bank in Bremerton — and it was the same bank he tried to hold up two years ago, and the same teller! I don’t like to go overboard on crime news, but sometimes they are stories about life you couldn’t make up. The getaway driver (who wasn’t arrested or even aware of what his friend was up to) even called the newsroom to tell us his side of the story. News has to be fun, engaging and talkative sometimes.

Q: What skills do new journalists need?

A: You have to be curious about the world, care about the community you are in, and be passionate about reporting and writing. And then you can fine tune your skills in photography, video, social media and public records analysis.

Q: If you weren’t working at your current job, what would you be doing?

A: If there’s a job testing running shoes, I’d take it.

Q: Finish this sentence: “A good PR person …”

A: …answers the phone when we call and ask unpopular or difficult questions, and explains why there’s no comment if there isn’t going to be one.

Q: What hidden talent or skill do you have that viewers/readers don’t know about you?

A: I coach a youth track team in my spare time, the Bremerton Jaguars. Convincing nine-year-olds that it’s enjoyable to run repeats of 800 meters or a mile requires a skill I may never master, but I’m learning.

The PR Pro Takeaway: I had the pleasure of meeting David at the BusinessWire Media Roundtable and received great insight from him about the media’s wants and needs. Thanks David! You can test my running shoes any time. Connect with David on Twitter.

The Fearey Group: The Next Thirty Years

Imageby Pat Fearey

The first thing I wanted when I started my public relations business was an electronic pencil sharper. I needed to write a lot. And the efficiency and technology of those whirling blades seemed to foretell a promising future. That was 33 years ago, and I couldn’t have guessed my good fortune.

I got my start doing public relations for the Seattle Center. After a few years, I began dating the man who eventually became my husband: Jack Fearey, Seattle Center director. I didn’t want anyone feeling they had to show me special deference because I was dating the boss so I left for a short stint doing PR at the Southland Corporation. It wasn’t too long before I hung out my shingle. My first big client was the Northwest Marine Trade Association, the folks who put on the annual Boat Show. And we never looked back.

Just a few short years ago, we used to huddle around a large table in our office to assemble press kits. Today, that table is pretty much unused, a place to put the large paper cutter, which also seems like an antique. When I started, there were no cells phones, no faxes (remember those?), no desktops. An IBM Selectric was a big investment. Everything has changed in communications. Sometimes, it simply astounds me.

But technology isn’t the biggest part of the story. That’s always been the people, both who we’ve worked with and those we’ve worked for. I feel blessed to remain in contact with so many former Fearey Groupers. They are an amazing group of people, with energy and passion and good ideas. I have always thrilled in the creativity of my colleagues. The learning experience never ends.

And of course, there are the clients. I’ve been there when they’ve won national awards for projects we helped develop. And I’ve gotten the call when things seem the darkest, when tears well up as problems are explained and situations unfold. It’s hard in this business to not get close to your clients. It just happens. I’m proud to say some of these friendships have stretched for decades. I’m delighted that I’m still making new ones.

I’ll be taking a lot more of my energies out in the tennis court instead of the court of public opinion in the next few years. But I’m happy to pass the baton to someone whom I both trust and admire, Aaron Blank. Integrity has been foundational to my business. Aaron shares this value. He has the people-skills, critical-thinking skills, and social media chops to lead and grow the company for the next 30 years.

I’ll still look over the balance sheet, offer an observation or two, make connections and share ideas. I’ll come into work and continue to be inspired. And every once in a while, I’ll make sure I have the sharpest pencils in the office.